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Start
Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18

Photogallery
Archive
1940-99


Walk
Magazine
Archive
1949-87


Newsletter
Archive
1949-
The Melbourne Bushies - Fifty years along the track (1940-90)

Walk magazine. I led many trips over the years including Murray River canoeing, Barrier Reef kayaking, caving and Christmas trips. I also became involved with Wilky and have been on many work parties there.

ATHOL SCHAFER

See 'Those Held in High Esteem', page 170.

BARRY SHORT

I joined the Melbourne Bushwalkers in 1960 after buying a copy of Walk magazine. Very quickly I was absorbed into the bushwalking way of life and I went on many walks in rapid succession; the longer walks stretched over two weeks. While walking extensively throughout the Victorian mountains, I went to Cradle Mountain, and Southwest Tasmania (before the HEC drowned Lake Pedder), took up snow-walking and then skiing (a much more efficient way to travel on snow). I tried rock-climbing and canoeing, and travelled into the Mallee and Sunset Country. I also started going further afield, visiting the Gibson Desert, the caves under the Nullarbor Plains, Central Australia, and the Flinders Ranges. I then went trekking in Nepal and overlanding from there to Britain. I am a cartographer by profession. Bushwalking still plays a big part in my life and as much of my holidays as possible is still spent in the bush.

LES SOUTHWELL

I am a professional engineer, keen landscape-photographer and earlier was a member of the Melbourne University Mountaineering Club. My favourite walking areas are the Victorian - New South Wales Alps and Southwest Tasmania. My first encounter with the Melbourne Bushies in Easter 1975 was a memorable one. We were camped overnight on the summit of Precipitous Bluff in Southern Tasmania in a fierce May storm, next to an MBW party consisting of Geoff Crapper, Ken MacMahon and Rob Harris. Next morning both parties set off separately in driving sleet to descend the North Wall and follow the stream into the shelter of the rainforest. Unfortunately we were not told that the stream disappeared into the sands a mere kilometre from the shores of New River Lagoon, leaving us in a ferocious tangle of ti-tree, bauera and cutting grass. Exhausted, we bivouacked in the scrub and next morning discovered the MBW party had also camped within shouting distance. So we teamed up